One Cannot Underestimate the Long-Term Power of “Stick-to-itiveness”

stick-to-itivenessYes, stick-to-itiveness is a real word and to save you time from looking it up I’ll quote Dictionary.com:

Stick-to-itiveness. noun. dogged perseverance; resolute tenacity

I’m writing a blog on this topic, not because it’s the New Year and I’m trying to keep you all motivated to stick with your resolutions, rather as I realize I’m approaching 16 years with Your Employment Solutions (YES) I’m reflecting on what it took for me to reach this rare milestone.

I found some very interesting charts and graphs from the Bureau of Labor Statistics regarding longevity on the job.

sticktoitiveness

The above chart show less than 1.4% of the U.S. workforce who started a new job between the ages of 18-24 held their job longer then 15 years. And additionally, based upon the chart, the Average-Joe my age would typically be in about his TENTH job by now! How do you measure-up with the trend?

Some professionals believe that job-hopping is a great way to become well rounded and gain new skills and experiences. Some go as far to say that keeping the same job for long periods of time is a bad thing and according to this blog “…after a while, your learning curve plateaus, your personal growth sputters, and then your passion dissipates.”

My experience with YES contradicts that statement. People really need to consider what their personal definition of “personal growth” and success is. For me, success is remaining gainfully employed, having financial stability (I’ve not missed a week of pay in 16 years!), supporting my family, gaining new skills and experiences, avoiding life’s “ruts” and enjoying my journey through life. Having worked in the same company for 16 years does not mean I’ve had the same “job” and have had no “personal growth” for 16 years. I’m proud to say I’ve experienced a wonderful life and career full of learning new things, experiencing new things and developing new passions.

Here’s my stick-to-itiveness story in a nutshell:

I started working as a temporary employee of YES and demonstrated enough work ethic that they offered me an opportunity to become a recruiter in-house as one of the then three-man operation. I then became a lead by default when we hired a fourth employee. I was trained to be a salesman in order to help the fledgling company grow. I was entrusted to manage one of the businesses largest expenses (Workers Compensation) and, in addition to other duties, became a safety manager. I have assisted in the opening and management of three branches. I have participated in the hiring and new-hire training of nearly all our staff members.

amigos of hondurasI had the opportunity to buy-out one of the business owners and become a partner in the business. I’ve even traveled to Honduras on two humanitarian trips with Amigos of Honduras which is a foundation started by one of our business owners. What more could I ask for after having dedicated 16 years to one company?

As for the next 16 years, there’s no telling what new skill or experiences I’ll have but one thing’s for sure, it’s up to me to ensure my passion and continued personal growth doesn’t dissipate.

Who would have thought that a 21-year-old kid, starting as an $8/hr temporary employee would someday become one of the owners of the business who collects dividends from the profit of the business he’s help to grow over those 16 years. Had I followed the Average-Joe’s career path of hopping jobs every couple years there’s no telling where I’d be or what my level of success would have been, but what I do know is that my stick-to-itiveness has paid dividends and I couldn’t be happier with my life.

My experience at YES may not lead to the same success and happiness for anyone working 16 years for one company, but it certainly is a beaming example of what’s possible. My advice for people entering the job market is: be reliable; work hard; don’t be afraid to try new things; continue your education; show dedication to employers who return the favor; be honest; don’t wait for your employer to pay you what you think your worth but work so hard that they will realize they can’t afford to lose you.

Hard Work EdisonWhile “job-hopping” may indeed be your pathway to success, one cannot underestimate the power of “stick-to-itiveness.”

Good luck!

Jarum Stone
Training & Safety Manager
Your Employment Solutions
yes safety

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Jarum Stone

Jarum Stone is the training and safety manager at Your Employment Solutions. He believes in the importance of discipline, ethics, hard work, and taking excellent care of customers. Jarum has over 13 years of leadership experience in workplace safety, customer service, sales, finance, employee management, and other staffing industry-specific functions.

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